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Joe and the great white deer December 29, 2006

Posted by Joe in Farm.
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Many years ago, I thought deer hunting was hard. Of course back then, it truly was hard for me. I had to get up very early in the morning, drive 2 hours to some public land just to hunt for a few hours at a location that I’d never even seen before. I usually ended up sleepily sitting in a tree in sub-freezing weather, wondering what I was doing out there. It wasn’t much fun so it’s no wonder I gave it up when I discovered duck hunting.

But since then I’ve learned that like real estate, deer hunting is all about location, location, location.

Deer are everywhere in this part of creation. You can see them most any time of the year. There are so many, in fact, they are considered a major nuisance by most folks around here. The deer love to eat your crops long before you’re ready to bring in the harvest. For example, they stomp holes into your watermelons and take a few nibbles to see if it’s ripe, then move on to the next one. They also eat your tomatoes, beans, peas, corn, and anything else of any appeal in your garden.

This year, I’ve harvested two large deer and have had several other opportunities that I’ve allowed to just pass by. And the funny part is that I haven’t been hunting yet. I’ve yet to spend the first minute in a tree stand.

All of these opportunities came while I was doing something else, usually playing with the kids in the family room. I’d look out and see some deer in the field. So, I’d quickly don my camouflage garb and head out to stalk the four-legged thieves.

Last year I shot one with my rifle from my back porch; but what fun is that? Now I enjoy seeing how stealthy I can be. I’ve stalked to within 25 yards of the beasts with both bow and rifle. It’s a game for me to see how close I can get to them without being discovered.  Maybe in a few years I’ll get good enough to hunt with a bowie knife.  🙂

I don’t hunt for trophy; I firmly believe that you should only hunt what you intend to eat. So when I harvest a deer, I bring it back to the house and process it myself. Last year, Laura helped me field dress one. This year Benjamin helped with another.

Here’s a picture of Benjamin helping me skin the deer. I didn’t include the picture in the blog itself in consideration for those who’d rather not see it.

We made roasts and ground venison into sausage. Very good stuff, if I do say so myself.

Benjamin and Rachel both helped grind it.

We saved the skin of one of them intending to tan it, but unfortunately we never got past step 2 – it’s a very time and labor intensive process that takes more than a month to complete.

Late this afternoon, I again spotted some deer in the field. As before I quickly gathered my hunting apparel together and headed out to see if I could sneak up on them. I did.

But much to my surprise, I saw something I’ve never seen before today. In amongst the other deer was an albino deer as white as snow. It was a sight to behold! I just sat there, well within shooting range, and watched it. Albino’s are protected in this state, but I wouldn’t have shot it anyway. What I sight!

I hope to see it again. Next time, I’ll head out with my camera.

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Comments»

1. Laurie - December 29, 2006

Very cool about the albino. I’ve lived in the midwest all my life and I’ve never seen an albino deer.

Enjoy your deer meat!

2. Joe - January 3, 2007

I’ve seen it several times since this post. I even sneaked up on it again late this afternoon but it was too dark to get a good picture of it.

Laura and the kids have seen it too. What a sight!


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